Monday, 18 January 2016

Experts Warn Tories Could Push Renewables Industry "Off a Cliff"


Cuts to Renewables Support Threaten Booming Industry in Scotland

Expert analysis has shown that UK Government mismanagement threatens to push the renewable energy industry “off a cliff” – just one week after it was revealed that wind power output has reached a record high.

The analysis by Bloomberg New Energy Finance on behalf of the Independent said that investment could collapse after 2019 due to an end to subsidies for onshore wind – despite investment in onshore wind across the UK doubling to a record £2.6bn last year.

David Hostert, the analyst who carried out the research, said that “the Government is kicking the onshore wind industry off the ladder too soon. Without some form of change in policy support, we could see investment drop off a cliff after 2019.”

Commenting, SNP MSP Chic Brodie said:

“This new analysis is further evidence that the UK Government have been reckless, regressive and irrational in their approach to the renewables industry.

“Last year onshore wind produced the equivalent of 97% of Scotland’s household electricity needs. That’s the sort of progress that should be embraced and built upon rather than undermined.

“We know that Scotland has a real opportunity to be a world leader on renewable energy – which can boost our economy, create jobs and protect the environment. And the excellent progress we’ve made in recent years must not be put at risk by the reckless and short-sighted approach of a Tory government with scant regard for Scotland’s interests.”
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